Sculpture in Context 2022 – part 2

The weather is a bit miserable at the moment, but there should be lovely crisp days ahead as we head into early autumn.

The National Botanic Gardens are magnificent this time of year, and for the month of September you can combine visiting the gardens with a treasure hunt for exciting sculptures all over the place, indoors and outdoors.

About Sculpture in Context

Sculpture in Context was established in 1985 to raise the profile of sculpture in Ireland and provide a platform for artists outside the normal gallery context. It is a not-for-profit organisation run by sculptors. The exhibition has been staged in the National Botanic Gardens since 2002.

Sculpture in Context promotes artists and creates opportunities for practicing artists to exhibit their works in a wider public arena. The organisation has provided much needed opportunities for Irish and non-Irish sculptors in Ireland.

LISTINGS INFORMATION

Exhibition: Sculpture in Context

Location: National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin

Dates: 1 September – 7 October 2022

Times: Mon-Fri 10:00-17:00, Sat-Sun 10:00-18:00.

Admission: Free. Group tours of the Gardens and the Exhibitions will be available for booking through Eventbrite

Website: Botanic Gardens

This year even more feltmakers are exhibiting so congrats to all and make sure to go visit!

As there are quite a number of feltmakers included there are two blog posts covering the exhibiting artists. This is the second blog post. Artists are listed in the order we have received information. If you have not been asked for details but are exhibiting in Sculpture in Context, please contact us as there are so many artists involved that we may have missed someone. This second blog covers the work of Carmen Garcia, Astrid Tomrop-Hofmann, Juliane Gorman and Claire Merry. Claire is a long time member of Feltmakers Ireland so we have included her piece here even if it isn’t made of felt.

What does Home feel like? by Carmen Garcia

This piece was made in response to the stories coming to us from the war in Ukraine. I wanted it to represent the pain, to be visceral, to be felt.

I used the dissonance between the homely, earthy slipper, that resonates with “cosy” and “safe” and the intense red of the exposed arteries and veins which resonates with life, but also with blood and violence.

However, what I am really interested in, is the feeling people experience while looking at it. Either having read the title or not.

What does Home feel like – Carmen Garcia

The Glow Worms Nest by Astrid Tomrop-Hofmann

The materials, shapes, structures and colours of my native surroundings provide inspiration for my creation. Working with different raw wool types ( unwashed and uncarded fleece loosened by hand ) fascinates me. 

This piece embodies warmth, softness, protection and comfort. The upright rods radiate decisiveness and togetherness, all the while surrounded by organic matter. 

I love to explore working with silk, recycled materials, paper, rich colours and texture combinations . I employ a variety of techniques to create my work and find joy and share it! 

Felting for me is diving into a world of unlimited opportunities. The dialogue with the material wool and the interaction of art and craft, and thereby the implementation of a millennium old technique, captivates me.

The Glow Worms Nest by Astrid Tomrop-Hofmann

Perpetual Felt by Juliane Gorman

Usually, I create whimsical wet-felted hats. However, for Sculpture in Context, I wanted to explore installations.

As I wandered through the gardens in winter, the ancient, naked stems of the Wisteria Chain Tent caught my eye. I found it unbelievable that this organic structure was so large that it almost was a building! Did it feel embarrassed not to have leaves? And what about its cascading blossoms? They would only exist for a few weeks.

My twirling purple pods are an attempt to adorn this quirky location.

There are spiralling, felted cords on each pod made from locally-raised Romney wool. My supplier for this material is Natural Wool Ireland. (https://www.naturalwoolireland.ie/)  Although the bulk of the fibre used in the pods is Merino and sadly not Irish-raised. Nonetheless, this wool is also sustainable because all sheep are shorn annually. 

Perpetual Felt by Juliane Gorman

Fly Me To The Moon by Claire Merry

I refer to myself as an ‘Art Butterfly’, as I have had great fun and satisfaction in playing with different media. It gives me great pleasure to try out something new and working with proven techniques from previous works.

I have worked with textiles, clays and principally for the last fourteen years with handmade felt. This piece is based on a previous much smaller one, so resizing it was a nice challenge. I love steampunk style, so I have teamed up the hot air balloon with the penny-farthing bicycle, to deliver flowers to the moon on slow power

Fly Me To The Moon by Claire Merry